Science Policy

Sealants

Pit and fissure sealants are polymeric materials that are applied to the occlusal surfaces of teeth, which do not benefit from the caries-preventive effects of fluoride to the same extent as smooth surfaces. Dental caries, one of the most common diseases of childhood, occurs predominantly as carious lesions in pits and fissures of teeth. A large percentage of occlusal surfaces can remain caries-free for up to ten years or more after a single application of a sealant. There is strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of sealants for the prevention of dental caries. Furthermore, studies show that incipient carious lesions that remain sealed do not progress. Based on current evidence, the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) continues to strongly recommend greater use of sealants by practitioners in private and public health practice. The AADR also endorses the practice that sealants could be used in conjunction with other caries-preventive measures, such as fluoride application.

 

(adopted 1991; revised 2009, revised 2015)

"A large percentage of occlusal surfaces can remain caries-free for up to ten years or more after a single application of a sealant."